Featured

In Season: Spring

It’s finally spring. I’m so excited I wet my plants! But for real… living in Chicago, winter goes on for most of the year. This is the time to shed winter fat and bring on spring rolls. Or something like that.

Spring is the season for light and fresh foods. Though you can get most produce year-round now, the flavors and colors of in season fruits and vegetables are hard to beat. Spring is the season for white and green asparagus, cauliflower, strawberries, and so much more.

We’ve put together a guide of fruits and vegetables that are in season for the spring. We encourage you to print it out and keep it handy when meal planning, or even bring it to the grocery store with you.

spring produce

You’ll never have to miss out on the prime time to eat spring produce again! Curious as to when a certain fruit or vegetable is in season? Feel free to message us and ask! We’d be happy to hear from you.

My favorite source for knowing when ingredients are in season and for helpful pairing tips is The Flavor Bible (and it’s new sister book The Vegetarian Flavor Bible). Check it out here:

 

 

 

Happy Spring, friends!

-K

This part always makes me cry.

You probably already know what I’m going to say. Cutting an onion. I’ve heard all the tricks… run hot water nearby, leave the root intact, lemon juice, freezing the onion, what have you. None of them work for me. So if you have some magical trick, please feel free to share!

Cutting an onion is one of the first techniques I learned in culinary school. It’s a basic technique used constantly, as onions are a great source for flavor building in cooking. I’ve gotten a ton of questions on how to properly cut an onion. As any chef will tell you, there are many ways to do something that achieves the same end result. Here is how we cut an onion – a quick and easy way to dice and slice an onion:

 

Tips for our method:

  • Use a sharp knife – this makes all the difference. A sharp knife makes this technique easy, and a lot safer.
  • Keep your fingers out of the way. When making the horizontal cuts to dice, be sure to keep your fingers even with your palm.
  • Make the horizontal and vertical cuts as big or small as your desires dice size. For example: if you want a small dice, make both sets of cuts about 1/4 inch apart.

Mastering this trick is important since onions are a foundational ingredient in so many recipes!

We like using cutting boards with grips on the sides to prevent the board from slipping, like these:


The Original GORILLA GRIP (TM) Set of 3 Non-Slip Reversible Cutting Boards, BPA Free, FDA Approved Materials (Set of 3 Boards: Green)

-K

Let the food journey begin!

I’m going to be honest with you. The first post on a blog is intimidating. But the good news is, once we get through this part, we can get down to the good stuff. And yes, I’m talking about the food!

Welcome to Simply Seasoned. This blog was a spit ball idea my sister threw out one day, that eventually turned into a dream, now becoming a reality.

Besides just loving to eat, I love food because it brings people together. It’s something everyone can connect with. Sometimes being a professional cook, I want to keep all my recipes to myself – so only I know the secret ingredients. But really, what’s the fun in that if everyone else can’t be enjoying it too?

On top of recipes, we will be posting a Did You Know? series. In this series, we will cover individual ingredients – their health benefits, common and uncommon uses, and more. We will also be sharing fun information that we learned through our experiences in a professional kitchen.

There will also be a Techniques and Skills section. Sounds boring, but I promise this will quickly become a great resource! We will be showing you how we prepare things – from dicing an onion to poaching an egg. Ever wonder how chefs prepare something? Don’t be shy – feel free to ask us how!

Though food at restaurants may look fancy, cooking all comes down to a basic set of techniques applied in various different ways. We are excited to share with you all that we have learned in a professional kitchen, and to help you make cooking at home simple – and fun!

Here’s to our new journey of food together. Lettuce celebrate!

-K